Monday, February 24, 2014

Christine's baby booties

So, years ago I posted a free pattern for Christine's baby booties as a PDF download. As you've noticed I haven't been around my blog in quite a while - in the meantime the hosting platform of the download shut down and was replaced with some other site, but the PDF disappeared.

I've only just found out about that the link doesn't work. I'd like to put the PDF back up for download again because I believe that's most comfortable if you want to keep the pattern in your collection, but right now it's quicker to just enter it as a blog post. So, here you go (I'll hope to add photos at a later time):

Christine’s Baby Booties

Materials
1 skein of baby yarn
A set of DPN’s; metric size 2-3, or according to the yarn

Cast on 40 stitches, divide evenly on 4 needles. Make sure not to twist! If you use stitch markers, place one here.
Purl 3 rows, knit 3 rows, p 3 rows, k 3 rows, p 3 rows.
K 1 row; *k2tog, yo, k2*, repeat till end of row. K 1 row. The top part is now finished.

Continue with the middle 11 stitches. Leave 14 stitches on one side and 15 on the other on 2 needles on hold.
*P 1 row, k 1 row, p 1 row.* Repeat 8 times.
K over all stitches again; pick up and k 10 stitches from each side out of the edge stitches. 60 stitches altogether. (If you find that with 10 stitches there is a hole in the booties, then pick up an additional stitch on each side – 11 instead of 10 each – and decrease those two extra stitches in the next round. Furthermore, to avoid holes when picking up and knitting these stitches, knit them through the back loop of the stitch. This avoids a hole.)

Distribute the stitches evenly on the needles (10 stitches, then 20, then 10, then 20 again). Purl 3 rows, knit 3 rows, p 3 rows, k 3 rows, p 3 rows.

Now to the bottom of the booties:
- P 1 row. P5 and place marker.
- K 6 stitches, k2tog, k 15, k2tog, k 9, k2tog, k 16, k2tog, k 6. P 1 row.
- K 5, k2tog, k 15, k2tog, k 7, k2tog, k16, k2tog, k 5. P 1 row.
- K 4, k2tog, k 15, k2tog, k 5, k2tog, k 16, k2tog, k 4. P 1 row.
- K 3, k2tog, k 15, k2tog, k 3, k2tog, k 16, k2tog, k 3. P 1 row.
- K 2, k2tog, k 15, k2tog, k 1, k2tog, k 16, k2tog, k 2. 40 stitches remain.

Knit 1 row and then cast off all stitches. - Either cast off by turning the bootie inside out – including the needles, distributing the remaining stitches on 2 needles and knitting all the remaining stitches together. Or simply cast off and then seam the stitches. I prefer knitting the stitches together, that way I don’t have to seam.
Alternatively, the kitchener stitch can be used here. It might give the smoothest result.

Finishing:
Pull an i-cord / a cord / a band through the yarnover-holes.

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Hello everyone,

Yes, it's been a while since my last post... again. Lots of things have been going on chez d.knit, like the search for the perfect new full-time job and working two other jobs at the same time, then I had an operation on my tailbone (don't worry, it was nothing serious, it just needed to be done and I'm almost back to normal again), lots of thinking about the future, and other stuff. There was knitting, too, but so far I didn't feel like taking pictures. Just like I didn't feel like blogging over the past months, but I think (hope) both is going to change soon. Oh, and I still haven't heard back from my ravelry yarn-exchange partner. Seems like my first thought about her wasn't so wrong at all.

Anyways, right now I'm working on knee stockings for K, originally intended for the Oktoberfest which starts this Saturday. I promised him last year I would make traditional stockings for him, but I started them too late this year so he probably will have to put on normal socks when he goes.

Gotta go... I promise pictures soon!

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

Update to last post

Knitter #1 messaged me today, explaining why I hadn't heard from her in a while. Apparently, she was snowed under with work and other stuff. Seems like I jumped to a conclusion a little too early.

Monday, May 04, 2009

Ravelry = Schmavelry?

I'm a bit upset right now, and it's all Ravelry's fault. Well, not really Ravelry's fault, but it's sort of the cause for my anger. I had some yarn in the "trade/sell" section of my stash, and was contacted by another knitter who was interested in that particular yarn. I agreed to swap the yarn because I thought this would be easier than selling. Just before we exchanged postal addresses, another knitter wrote to me, willing to buy the very same yarn. But as I had promised it to the first knitter, I had to say no.

Anyways, knitter #1 and I exchanged addresses, and she said she'd mail the yarn she wanted to swap with me in the next couple of days. I myself, on the other hand, didn't get to mail the yarn she wanted only before Easter (even though I hadn't received anything in return yet). Because I had mailed a few things before that did not arrive at the addressee, I decided to go with a registered letter. The mail person gave me a receipt with a tracking number, so I could check where letter was. So, that's how I know that the yarn landed at the address I was given. However, I haven't heard a thing from knitter #1 since. Not even after I messaged her to ask if she had received the yarn she had wanted to swap. (Needless to say that my letter box remains pretty empty - no yarn)

I guess it's quite logic that I'm pretty pissed off right now. So far, I learned that knitters and the knitting community are very nice and generous; but now, knitters rip off other knitters. I'm not sure if I'm more upset or more disappointed.

Friday, March 20, 2009

Update

I found the article! (I knew I could do it!) It's in the Winter 2008 issue of Interweave Knits, and it's called "The Historian: (D)evolving Traditions In Faroe", written by Robin Hansen. Sadly, there are no book recommendations. But I think I'll do some research with the help of the article; let's see what I can find out about Faroese knitting!